Max Richter On ‘Sleep,’ The World Renowned Composer Helps Us Insomniacs, (VIDEO), Trailer, Highlight Hollywood News

MAXRICHTER05YuliaMahrphoto
World renowned composer Max Richter has become well known to movie and TV fans for his mesmerizing compositions of films such as “Shutter Island” and shows such as the acclaimed HBO series “The Leftovers.”  I recently spoke with the icon from his Berlin, Germany studios, and found out that he was working on a lot of projects, including one for insomniacs like me.  On Sunday, we’ll print our review of Richter’s “Sleep.”

Recently speaking about that project with LAT, he said, “The one-to-one connections with the creative people, that’s easy,” he said. “It’s actually all the people in the suits — you have to get past them somehow. That’s the challenging part.”
 max-richter-001
Though he is the composer for HBO’s drama series “The Leftovers,” which begins its second season in October, Richter is also becoming a favorite for Hollywood executives, and explained why.
“For them, their default setting is they want a safe decision. That’s not for me,” he explained.
His latest project is in many ways his most daring and least conventional work: The eight-hour “Sleep,” available from Deutsche Grammophon in September, is an epic piece designed to be experienced, as the title suggests, while you are falling asleep.
“Sleep” represents both an apotheosis of Richter’s unapologetically emotional and accessible style — a cross between minimalism and ambient electronica — and a significant departure into experimental territory.
Mixing lush instrumental harmonies and electronic soundscapes, the piece exerts a trance-like pull through its churning rhythms and pulsations. “It’s a gigantic lullaby,” explained the composer.
 max-richter2
“Sleep,” which features 31 separate tracks, runs 8 hours, 24 minutes, 21 seconds. The piece was partly inspired by J.S. Bach’s “Goldberg Variations,” believed to be written for a German count suffering from insomnia.
“People are chronically sleep deprived — eight hours is something hardly anyone gets,” said Richter. The new piece is intended to plug into the listener’s “slow wave sleep,” he said — a deep-sleep stage that precedes the dreaming usually associated with rapid eye movement.
“The state is very important in learning and consolidating information,” said the composer, who consulted with neurological experts. “There’s been a lot of research in how this state is very valuable to us.”
People are chronically sleep deprived — eight hours is something hardly anyone gets.- Max Richter, composer

“Sleep” isn’t the longest piece of music ever conceived — that honor goes to John Cage’s ongoing, 639-year organ work “As Slow As Possible.” But it is believed to be the longest musical work ever recorded. (Deutsche Grammophon is releasing it in a full eight-hour version and an abridged one-hour version.)
The piece resembles Richter’s previous works in its unmistakably modern conception while also drawing on Renaissance and Baroque conventions — strategic repetitions and variations, simple melodies and castrato-like vocals.
“Sleep” was recorded this year in a piecemeal fashion, with the string instrumentals captured in New York, vocals in London and the rest recorded and mixed in Berlin.
“Sleep” was recorded this year in a piecemeal fashion, with the string instrumentals captured in New York, vocals in London and the rest recorded and mixed in Berlin.
Here’s the official trailer for “Sleep” below:
Written By: Tommy Lightfoot Garrett
Photographs are Courtesy:  Mike Terry
Follow us on Twitter @HighlightHwd or @LightfootinHwd