Ed Sheeran-Penned Song for Tim McGraw Is Target of Copyright Lawsuit


Don’t mess with the McGraws, they are not afraid to fight in court.  Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, who together released a song in October titled “The Rest of Our Life,” along with Ed Sheeran who is credited with co-writing this tune, have all been hauled into court in the latest copyright lawsuit targeting a chart-topper.


The complaint was filed on Wednesday in New York federal court by Sean Carey and Beau Golden, two Australians who say the McGraw/Hill track is “blatant copying” of their own 2014 song, “When I Found You.”

“The copying is, in many instances, verbatim, note-for-note copying of original elements of the Song, and is obvious to the ordinary observer,” states the complaint.


“It very well may have been an agent of Sony Music Entertainment who provided the other defendants herein with access to the Song,” states the complaint, which is posted in full below.

According to the lawsuit, Carey and Golden have record deals with major labels and music direction positions with Netflix. “When I Found You” was released on ABC Records by co-writer and recording artist Jasmine Rae and was a hit in Australia.


Rae and Golden were in Carey’s studio to write music last month, continues the complaint, when Rae allegedly mentioned a fan tweet about the Tim McGraw and Faith Hill song. The three listened and soon investigated taking legal action.


Busch writes that Rae wanted to involve in the process her boyfriend, Tim Holland, who was a marketing manager for Sony. They all allegedly got on a conference call and later met in person.


“During this conversation, Mr. Holland admitted to knowing about the Infringing Song months in advance of its release because he was tasked with promoting and marketing the Infringing Song and Infringing Sound Recording before its release,” states the complaint. “When questioned by Plaintiffs as to his silence about the similarities between ‘When I Found You’ and the Infringing Song/Infringing Sound Recording, Mr. Holland stated he did not want to lose his job with Sony Music. … When pressed further by Plaintiffs, Mr. Holland indicated that he had known that the songs were substantially similar for more than two months prior to the October 5, 2017 release date of the Infringing Song/Infringing Sound Recording.”

THR first reported the news.

Written By: Tommy Lightfoot Garrett
Photographs are Courtesy:   AP
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